Towards 3D bioelectronics: Integration of conducting polymer devices with 3D models of cells in vitro

Charalampos Pitsalidis, Chrysanthie Moysidou, Janire Saez, Donata Iandolo, Magali Ferro, Roisin M. Owens

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In vitro models of biological systems are essential for our understanding of biological systems. In many cases where animal models have failed to translate to useful data for human diseases, physiologically relevant in vitro models are required. Polymeric electroactive materials and devices can bridge the gap between hard inflexible materials used for physical transducers and soft, compliant biological tissues. An additional advantage of these electronic materials is their flexibility for processing and fabrication in a wide range of formats. Here, we present our recent progress in adapting conducting polymer devices, including simple electrodes and transistors, to integrate with fully perfused 3D cell models representing human tissues.

Original languageBritish English
Title of host publication22nd International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2018
Pages267-269
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9781510897571
StatePublished - 2018
Event22nd International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2018 - Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Province of China
Duration: 11 Nov 201815 Nov 2018

Publication series

Name22nd International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2018
Volume1

Conference

Conference22nd International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2018
Country/TerritoryTaiwan, Province of China
CityKaohsiung
Period11/11/1815/11/18

Keywords

  • Conducting polymer
  • Electroactive
  • In vitro model
  • Organ-on-chip
  • Organic Bioelectronics

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