Inverse association between body mass index and all-cause mortality in rural chinese adults: 15-year follow-up of the Anqing cohort study

Jie Yang, Nannan Cheng, Yue Zhang, Lijing Ye, Jingyi Li, Ziyi Zhou, Zhuo Wang, Lishun Liu, Xiao Huang, Xinglong Liang, Tianchi Ling, Yongcheng Xu, Yun Song, Binyan Wang, Genfu Tang, Xianhui Qin, Pierre Zalloua, Huisheng Zhang, Fangrong Yan, Xiping Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective To investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and all-cause mortality in a Chinese rural population. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting This study was conducted from 2003 to 2018 in Anqing, Anhui Province, China. Participants 17 851 participants aged 25-64 years (49.4% female) attending physical examinations and questionnaire were included in this study. The inclusion criterion was families having a minimum of three participating siblings. The exclusion criteria included participants without family number and BMI data at baseline. Outcome measures The outcome measure was all-cause mortality. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis was performed to determine the association between baseline BMI and all-cause mortality. Results During a mean follow-up period of 14.1 years, 730 deaths (8.0%) occurred among men, and 321 deaths (3.6%) occurred among women. The mean BMI for males was 21.3±2.5 kg/m 2, and for female it was 22.1±3.1 kg/m 2. Baseline BMI was significantly inversely associated with all-cause mortality risk for per SD increase (OR, 0.79 (95% CI, 0.72 to 0.87) for males; OR, 0.88 (95% CI, 0.76 to 1.01) for females). When BMI was stratified with cut points at 20 and 24 kg/m 2, compared with the low BMI group, a significantly lower risk of death was found in the high BMI group (BMI ≥24: OR, 0.57 (95% CI, 0.43 to 0.77) in males; 0.65 (95% CI, 0.46 to 0.93) in females) after adjustment for relevant factors. Conclusions In this relatively lean rural Chinese population, the risk of all-cause mortality decreased with increasing BMI. The excess risk of all-cause mortality associated with a high BMI was not seen among this rural population.

Original languageBritish English
Article numbere045495
JournalBMJ Open
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Aug 2021

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • nutrition & dietetics
  • public health

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