Game theoretical analysis of collaborative social applications

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

During the last decade, social applications have witnessed a rapid growth in their use. Millions of people are utilising them on a daily basis in order to share their experience, information and to communicate with their family members and friends. Lately, these technologies have been used to foster collaboration in education, however, it is a case of hit and miss and without established techniques to ensure or replicate success. A number of factors contribute to the limited success of such groups, one such factor is the presence of selfish members. A selfish user adopts a free riding behaviour that takes advantage of the collaborative group without contributing back. Such a behaviour will affect the group's sustainability and affect the participants willingness to contribute. To improve the survival of educational groups in social applications, free riding behaviour needs to be studied, its impact on the group survivability assessed and then addressed. In this paper, we formally analyse the impact of the free riding behaviour by means of repeated game theory where classical and generous Tit-for-Tat are used.

Original languageBritish English
Title of host publicationCollaborateCom 2012 - Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Collaborative Computing
Subtitle of host publicationNetworking, Applications and Worksharing
Pages628-634
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event8th IEEE International Conference on Collaborative Computing: Networking, Applications and Worksharing, CollaborateCom 2012 - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: 14 Oct 201217 Oct 2012

Publication series

NameCollaborateCom 2012 - Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Collaborative Computing: Networking, Applications and Worksharing

Conference

Conference8th IEEE International Conference on Collaborative Computing: Networking, Applications and Worksharing, CollaborateCom 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period14/10/1217/10/12

Keywords

  • Collaborative Groups
  • Collaborative Learning
  • Free Riding
  • Game Theory
  • Social Applications
  • Tit-for-Tat

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