G-protein-coupled receptors, channels, and Na+-H+ exchanger in nuclear membranes of heart, hepatic, vascular endothelial, and smooth muscle cells

Ghassan Bkaily, Moni Nader, Levon Avedanian, Sana Choufani, Danielle Jacques, Pedro D'Orléans-Juste, Fernand Gobeil, Sylvain Chemtob, Johny Al-Khoury

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

The action of several peptides and drugs is thought to be primarily dependent on their interactions with specific cell surface G-protein-coupled receptors and ionic transporters such as channels and exchangers. Recent development of 3-D confocal microscopy allowed several laboratories, including ours, to identify and study the localization of receptors, channels, and exchangers at the transcellular level of several cell types. Using this technique, we demonstrated in the nuclei of several types of cells the presence of Ca2+ channels as well as Na+-H+ exchanger and receptors such as endothelin-1 and angiotensin II receptors. Stimulation of these nuclear membrane G-protein-coupled receptors induced an increase of nuclear Ca2+. Our results suggest that, similar to the plasma membrane, nuclear membranes possess channels, exchangers and receptors such as those for endothelin-1 and angiotensin II, and that the nucleus seems to be a cell within a cell. This article will emphasize these findings.

Original languageBritish English
Pages (from-to)431-441
Number of pages11
JournalCanadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Volume84
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Angiotensin II
  • Calcium channel
  • Confocal microscopy
  • Endothelin-1
  • Na-H exchanger
  • Nuclear membranes

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