Experimental and modeling studies on extraction of cholesterol from cow brain using supercritical carbon dioxide

N. Vedaraman, C. Srinivasakannan, G. Brunner, B. V. Ramabrahmam, P. G. Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Slaughterhouse products of animal organs such as brain, liver contains large amount of lipids. Cholesterol is one of the major lipids present in animal brain. To extract cholesterol from cow brain a small extractor was fabricated experiments conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. The extraction was studied by varying the process parameters such as pressure, temperature and the mass flow of super critical fluid. Extracted cholesterol was analyzed for its structure to confirm it by DSC, NMR and IR and purity by GC. A maximum of 52% of the total cholesterol present in the brain sample could be extracted using a supercritical fluid, in comparison with the conventional extraction method using dichloroethane where 48% of total cholesterol could be extracted. Modeling of the experimental data is attempted with the use of differential mass balance equation across the extraction column, with the accumulation of solute in the solid phase defined using Fick's diffusion equation. The effective diffusion coefficient is estimated by minimizing the error between the experimental data and that predicted by the model. The effective diffusion coefficient was found to increase with the temperature of extraction and with the flow rate of the supercritical fluid. The effective diffusion coefficient was found to vary between 1.9 and 2.8 × 10-13 m2/s for the entire range of experiments used in the present study.

Original languageBritish English
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Supercritical Fluids
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

Keywords

  • Cholesterol
  • Cow brain
  • Modeling
  • Supercritical fluid extraction

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