Evaluation of available force reduction factors for concrete bridges

A. J. Kappos, Th S. Paraskeva, J. F. Moschonas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The paper presents a methodology for evaluating available force reduction factors (R) for seismic design of concrete bridges. The usual procedure for analytically estimating this factor is through pushover curves derived for the bridge in (at least) its longitudinal and transverse direction. The shape of such curves depends on the seismic energy dissipation mechanism of the bridge; hence, bridges are assigned to two categories, those with inelastically responding piers and those with bearings and strong, elastically responding, piers. The methodology was applied for evaluating the available R-factors (for bridges of the first category) or R eq-factors (for bridges of the second category) of seven actual bridges, forming part of Egnatia Highway, in Greece. It was found that in all cases the available force reduction factors were higher than those used for design.

Original languageBritish English
Title of host publication9th US National and 10th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2010, Including Papers from the 4th International Tsunami Symposium
Pages3936-3945
Number of pages10
StatePublished - 2010
Event9th US National and 10th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2010, Including Papers from the 4th International Tsunami Symposium - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: 25 Jul 201029 Jul 2010

Publication series

Name9th US National and 10th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2010, Including Papers from the 4th International Tsunami Symposium
Volume5

Conference

Conference9th US National and 10th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering 2010, Including Papers from the 4th International Tsunami Symposium
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period25/07/1029/07/10

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluation of available force reduction factors for concrete bridges'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this