Effects of burning rice straw residue on-field on soil organic carbon pools: Environment-friendly approach from a conventional rice paddy in central Viet Nam

Nguyen Sy Toan, Do Hong Hanh, Nguyen Thi Dong Phuong, Phan Thi Thuy, Pham Duy Dong, Nguyen Thanh Gia, Le Duc Tam, Tran Thi Ngoc Thu, Do Thi Van Thanh, Kuan Shiong Khoo, Pau Loke Show

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14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rice straw residue management is still facing many problems worldwide. This study used two environmentally friendly methods to investigate the effects of rice straw burning activity on water-extracted carbohydrate content in long-term paddy soil. Soil samples were collected at a depth within 0–15 cm at the paddy field before and after burning rice straw (pre-burning and post-burning), then extracted by distilled water at the ratio of 1:10 (soil: water) for measuring hot water (at 80 °C) and water extracted carbohydrate (at 25 °C) (HECH and WECH). The results showed that burning rice straw did not alter soil organic carbon (SOC); however, soil pH increased approximately 8.3%. Meanwhile, WECH and HECH ranged from 233 to 630 mg kg−1, with the highest HECH in Pre-burning treatment, while the lowest amount addressed WECH of Post-burning treatment. Extracted carbohydrate decreased after burning rice straw compared to Pre-burning soil. On the other hand, hot water increased 39–58% of carbohydrates compared to water extraction. We conclude that burning rice straw did not affect SOC but tends to reduce their labile carbon pools, and the heating process likely degrade part of SOC when extracted at high temperatures.

Original languageBritish English
Article number133596
JournalChemosphere
Volume294
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Keywords

  • Conventional cultivation
  • Hot water extracted carbohydrate
  • Labile carbon
  • Long-term paddy
  • Water extracted carbohydrate

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