Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Induction Potential of Extracts from Fermented Citrullus vulgaris Thunb. Seeds on Cervical and Liver Cancer Cells

Rachael Aderonke Ayo-Lawal, Omolaja Osoniyi, Nicole Remaliah Samantha Sibuyi, Mervin Meyer, Okobi Ekpo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The anti-cancer activities of many fermented foods and beverages are now scientifically established. Ogiri-egusi is a condiment prepared from fermentation of Citrullus vulgaris (melon) seeds and consumed in many countries of West Africa. Its anti-oxidative and anti-hyperlipidaemic properties have been reported. This study investigated the anti-cancer activities of the aqueous and methanolic extracts from ogiri-egusi. Cytotoxicity was investigated using the MTT and colony-formation inhibition assays while flow-cytometer based Apopercentage assay was used to quantify apoptosis in extracts-treated cervical and liver cancer and normal human fibroblast cells. The inhibitory concentration responsible for killing 50% of cells after 24h by the aqueous extract in KMST-6, HeLa, and Hep-G2 cells were estimated at 1.610, 1.020, and 1.507mg/mL respectively. While these values reduced with increasing incubation time in cancer cells it increased in the non-cancer cell. Furthermore, the extract significantly induced apoptosis in HeLa (97±0.18%) and Hep-G2 (73±6.73%) cells. These findings were corroborated by cells morphologic presentations and inhibition of colony formation assay. These findings suggest that the aqueous extract from fermented Citrullus vulgaris seeds might be a nutraceutical with potential anti-cancer properties.

Original languageBritish English
Pages (from-to)132-146
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Dietary Supplements
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • anti-cancer
  • apoptosis
  • fermented condiment
  • MTT
  • ogiri-egusi

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