Agile management of uncertain requirements via generalizations: A case study

Karl Reed, Ernesto Damiani, Gabriele Gianini, Alberto Colombo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

A major justification for the agile class of software processes is that customer requirements often change substantially during development, with the result that developers must work with a ever-changing specification. The best way of dealing with this, it is claimed, is a process including adaptive and iterative steps allowing the code under development to change to meet an evolving requirement. In this paper, we use quantitative process data to argue that the deliberate development of an evolvable design, based upon extensions and variations to the requirements, and the generality derivable from the implemented system, may provide agility within a more traditional development, showing that the two concepts are interchangeable, to some extent. In doing so, the paper draws upon our joint work on evolvable systems, and upon a concept developed by one of us in the 1980's, "The Contraction of Generality", to illustrate the alternatives.

Original languageBritish English
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2004 Workshop on Quantitative Techniques for Software Agile Process, QUTE-SWAP 2004
EditorsErnesto Damiani, Michele Marchesi, Giancarlo Succi
Pages40-45
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)1595930019
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Nov 2004
Event2004 Workshop on Quantitative Techniques for Software Agile Process, QUTE-SWAP 2004 - Newport Beach, United States
Duration: 5 Nov 2004 → …

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering
Volume05-November-2004

Conference

Conference2004 Workshop on Quantitative Techniques for Software Agile Process, QUTE-SWAP 2004
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityNewport Beach
Period5/11/04 → …

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