A dislocation based gradient plasticity theory with applications to size effects

Rashid K. Abu Al-Rub, George Z. Voyiadjis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The intent of this work is to derive a physically motivated mathematical form for the gradient plasticity that can be used to interpret the size effects observed experimentally. This paper addresses a possible, yet simple, link between the Taylor's model of dislocation hardening and the strain gradient plasticity. Evolution equations for the densities of statistically stored dislocations and geometrically necessary dislocations are used to establish this linkage. The dislocation processes of generation, motion, immobilization, recovery, and annihilation are considered in which the geometric obstacles contribute to the storage of statistical dislocations. As a result a physically sound relation for the material length scale parameter is obtained as a function of the course of plastic deformation, grain size, and a set of macroscopic and microscopic physical parameters. The proposed model gives good predictions of the size effect in micro-bending tests of thin films and microtorsion tests of thin wires.

Original languageBritish English
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME Applied Mechanics Division 2005
Pages69-77
Number of pages9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: 5 Nov 200511 Nov 2005

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Applied Mechanics Division, AMD
Volume256
ISSN (Print)0160-8835

Conference

Conference2005 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2005
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period5/11/0511/11/05

Keywords

  • Gradient Plasticity
  • Length Scale
  • Non-local
  • Size Effects

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